Conjunctions Quiz

Cool Conjunctions Quiz

What are Conjunctions?

Conjunctions are joining words.They are used to joun words or groups of words together. And,or,but ,because are some common conjunctions. They may be small or seem insignificant but are very important for constructing sentences. They join words,phrases AND clauses together. Notice AND is a conjunction.

These are of three kinds:

Coordinating conjunctions-They are used to join phrases ,words and independent clauses. The weather is hot in Delhi but hotter in Rajasthan. For,and , but,yet,so,or,nor are some conjunctions to use.

Subordinating conjuctions-introduces a dependent clause and ties it to an independent clause If you do not study you will fail. After,although,as,if,as much as,as soon as are some examples.

Correlative conjunctions-A pair of conjunctions that must be used together. Either the father or the mother must sign the report card. Either/or,neither/nor,not only/but also ,such /that,whether/or are some pairs of conjunctions.

Simply put, a “conjunction” is a word or part-of speech that joins together words, phrases, clauses, or sentences. As it is, there are three types of conjunctions, namely: coordinate conjunction; subordinate conjunction; and correlative conjunction. In order to get a clear perspective of the three types of conjunctions. look closely at the following illustrative examples.

COORDINATE CONJUNCTION.

EXAMPLES. There are four coordinate conjunctions : and; but; or; nor.

AND: (linking two clauses/sentences). I went to the store, and I bought some grocery items. Note here that the conjunction “and” links the clause “I went to the store” and “I bought some grocery items.”

AND: (linking phrases). I bought ripe apples and juicy plums at the market. Note here that the conjunction “and” links the two phrases “ripe apples” and “juicy plums.”

AND:(linking two words). I bought apples and prunes at the market. Note her that the conjunction “and” links the two words “apples” and “prunes.”

BUT: (linking two clauses). I like apples, but she likes plums. Note here that the conjunction “but” links the two sentences “I like apples” and “she likes plums.”

OR: (linking two nouns). Give me this or that. Note here that the conjunction “or” links the two pronouns “this” and “that.”

OR: (linking two noun phrases). Give me this book or that book. Note here that the conjunction “or” links the two noun phrases “this book” and “that book.”

NOR: Do not give me this book nor that book. Note here that the conjunction “nor” links the two noun phrases “this book” and “that book.”

SUBORDINATE CONJUNCTION.

EXAMPLES: There are four kinds of subordinate conjunctions, also known as adverbial conjunctions, namely: adverb of time; adverb of reason; adverb of condition; adverb of concession. A subordinate or adverb conjunction, which introduces an adverb clause, always occurs in a complex sentence.

TIME: After he came home, he took a shower. Note here that the adverb conjunction of time “after” links the two clauses “ after he came home” and “he took a shower.”

REASON: Since (because) he was tired, he went straight to bed. Note here that the adverb conjunction of reason “since (because)” links the two clauses “ since he was tired” and “he went straight to bed.”

CONDITION: If you need money, you will have to earn it. Note here that the adverb conjunction of condition “if” links the two clauses “ if you need money” and “you will have to earn it.”

CONCESSION: Although(though) you have missed one test, you will still be promoted to the next grade. Note here that the adverb conjunction of concession “although” links the two clauses “although you have missed one test” and “ you will still be promoted to the next grade.

CORRELATIVE CONJUNCTION.

EXAMPLES: There are generally two kinds of correlative conjunctions, namely:

Either………or; and neither …….nor. NOTE: These two types of conjunctions represent an alternative or no alternative.

EITHER…..OR: Either John or Oliver will represent our class at the meeting. Note here that “either……or” deals with an alternative.

NEITHER….NOR: Nether John nor Oliver will represent our class at the meeting. Note here that “neither….nor” does not deal with an alternative.

In sum, here is the definition of “conjunction” with appropriate examples of its multiple uses.

After this massive theory, let’s get to the quiz now! 😀

Conjunction Quiz

Cool Conjunctions Quiz 1

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24 thoughts on “Cool Conjunctions Quiz”

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  2. Fun to so, these quizzes…very handy to use for my kids as well. Especially with the explanation of the grammatical definition.

    Reply

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